Course Descriptions

 

English

 

English I                                                                                       1 credit
Grade 9                                                                                                       N/A pds/wk

This English 9 course includes engaging and interactive instruction about reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language, with a focus on exploring a wide variety of genres and their elements. Students learn how to carefully read, interpret, and analyze literature and nonfiction works of cultural or historical significance appropriate to grade 9. Throughout the course, students practice narrative, informational, and argumentative writing. Students also develop and deliver presentations and participate in discussions with their peers.

                                                                                         

English II                                                                                        1 credit
Grade 10                                                                                                    N/A pds/wk

Prerequisite: English I

This English 10 course includes engaging and interactive instruction about reading, writing,speaking and listening, and language, with a focus on exploring a wide variety of genres and their elements. Students learn how to carefully read, interpret, and analyze literature and nonfiction works of cultural or historical significance appropriate to grade 10. Throughout the course, students practice narrative, informational, and argumentative writing. Students also develop and deliver presentations and participate in discussions with their peers.

English III                                                                                      1 credit
Grade 11                                                                                                     N/A pds/wk
Prerequisite: English II

In this genre-based course, students sharpen their reading comprehension skills and analyze important themes in classic and modern works of American literature, including short stories, poetry, drama, and novels. Students refine their skills of written expression by writing memoirs, persuasive essays, research essays, workplace documentation, and more. They develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Literature: Students read short stories, poetry, drama, and novels, sharpening their reading comprehension skills and analyzing important themes in American literature. Language Skills: Students continue to work on their oral and written expression skills, writing a variety of essays, including memoirs, persuasive and research essays, and workplace documentation. Students plan, organize, and revise their essays in response to feedback.

English IV                                                                                    1 credit
Grade 12                                                                                                      N/A pds/wk

Prerequisite: English III

This course emphasizes critical reading and writing skills.  Students are required to synthesize materials from a variety of sources and original ideas and to engage in reading, writing, and speaking as an interconnected process.  Students will study literary works to gain knowledge of specific genres, world authors, history, critical approaches, and ideological content.  In addition to world literature units, students will analyze and evaluate poetry, short stories, and novels, as well as a variety of pieces of “real world” non-fiction.  

 
Honors English I

This English 9 Honors course includes engaging and interactive instruction about reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language, with a focus on exploring a wide variety of genres and their elements. Students learn how to carefully read, interpret, and analyze literature and nonfiction works of cultural or historical significance appropriate to grade 9. Throughout the course, students practice narrative, informational, and argument writing. Students also develop and deliver presentations, and participate in discussions with their peers. This course also includes an independent honors project each semester.

 

Honors English II

This English 10 Honors course includes engaging and interactive instruction about reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language, with a focus on exploring a wide variety of genres and their elements. Students learn how to carefully read, interpret, and analyze literature and nonfiction works of cultural or historical significance appropriate to grade 10. Throughout the course, students practice narrative, informational, and argument writing. Students also develop and deliver presentations and participate in discussions with their peers. This course also includes an independent honors project each semester.

 

Honors English III

In this course, students read and analyze works of American literature from colonial to contemporary times, including poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and nonfiction. The literary works provide opportunities for critical writing, creative projects, and online discussions. Students develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Students enrolled in this challenging course will also complete independent projects that deepen their understanding of the themes and ideas presented in the curriculum.

 

Honors English IV

Students read selections from British and world literature and analyze the themes, styles, and structures of these texts. They also make thematic connections among diverse authors, periods, and settings. Students work independently on many of their analyses and engage in creative collaboration with their peers. Students also practice critical reading and writing test-taking skills.

 

AP English Language/Comp.                                                                         1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

     

Students learn to understand and analyze complex works by a variety of authors. They explore the richness of language, including syntax, imitation, word choice, and tone. They also learn composition style and process, starting with exploration, planning, and writing. This continues with editing, peer review, rewriting, polishing, and applying what they learn to academic, personal, and professional contexts. In this equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, students prepare for the AP exam.

 

AP English Literature/Comp.                                                                               1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

 In this course, the equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, students are immersed in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. Students read and write daily, using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and discussions. The course places special emphasis on reading
comprehension, structural and critical analyses of written works, literary vocabulary, and recognizing and understanding literary devices. Students prepare for the AP exam.

 

Grammar and Composition                                                                               1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                 N/A pds/wk

This refresher course helps students improve their understanding of grammar and usage basics and enhance their communication skills through writing exercises and discussions with their peers. Students start by completing a diagnostic writing assignment to identify strengths and areas for improvement. They receive step-by-step instruction on the writing process, follow activities to develop their grammar skills, and have multiple opportunities to practice formal and informal writing. Students use literature and expository pieces as models for their own writing. They participate in threaded online conversations with the teacher and their fellow students to discuss their writing, receive constructive feedback for revision, and comment on other students’ work. Throughout the course, rubrics help students remember what is expected of them and help them produce their best work.

 

Creative Writing                                                                                                    1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

Students create original essays, poems, and short stories in this course, which focuses on the four-step process writing model. They read professionally written forms of creative writing as models and then integrate their impressions of these works with their personal life experiences as they compose their own writing projects. Students are encouraged to write about topics they find engaging as they practice writing on the following themes: narration, definition, process analysis, cause and effect, and comparison/contrast. The teacher supplies feedback that helps students learn how to improve their self-expression and self-editing skills.

 

Journalism                                                                                                          0.5 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

Students are introduced to the historical importance of journalism in America. They study the basic principles of print and online journalism as they examine the role of printed news media in our society. They learn investigative skills, responsible reporting, and journalistic writing techniques as they read, respond to, and write their own news and feature articles. Students conduct interviews, research, write, and design their own publications.                                                                                                     
                       

Mathematics

Algeb I                                                                                          1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                 N/A pds/wk

 

This Algebra 1 course is intended to formalize and extend the mathematics that students
learned in the middle grades. In this course, students deepen their understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other. Students also apply linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. The course also covers analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions.

 

Algebra II                                                                                       1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                 N/A pds/wk

Prerequisite: Algebra I

In this Algebra 2 course, students build on their work with linear, quadratic, and
E
xponential functions, and extend their repertoire to include polynomial, rational, radical, and trigonometric functions. Students also expand their ability to model situations and solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. The course covers sequences and series, probability distributions, and more advanced data analysis techniques.

 

Geometry                                                                                        1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

Prerequisite: Algebra I

This Geometry course builds on the geometry covered in middle school to explore more complex geometric situations and deepen students’ ability to explain geometric relationships, moving toward formal mathematical arguments. Specific topics include similarity and congruence, analytic geometry, circles, the Pythagorean theorem, right triangle trigonometry, analysis of three dimensional objects, conic sections, and geometric modeling.

 

Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry                                                                                1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

 Pre-calculus weaves together previous study of algebra, geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on the mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions; systems of equations; and conic sections in the first semester. The second semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and laws of cosine and sine; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers. Cross-curricular connections are made throughout the course to calculus, art, history, and a variety of other fields related to mathematics.

     

 Calculus                                                                                        1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

 This course provides a comprehensive survey of differential and integral calculus concepts, including limits, derivative and integral computation, linearization, Riemann sums, the fundamental theorem of calculus, and differential equations. Content is presented across ten units and covers various applications, including graph analysis, linear motion, average value, area, volume, and growth and decay models. In this course, students use an online textbook that supplements the instruction they receive and provides additional opportunities to practice using the content they’ve learned. Students use an embedded graphing calculator applet (GCalc) for their work on this course; the software for the applet can be downloaded at no charge.

 

Integrated Math I                                                                          1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                 N/A pds/wk

This first-year high school integrated math course focuses on linear and simple exponential models. The course contrasts linear behavior with exponential behavior, and uses both linear and simple exponential equations as models. Students learn about and work extensively with functions—analyzing function properties and behavior, creating new functions from known functions, and applying functions to various continuous and discrete situations. The statistics in the course focus on modeling. Geometry topics covered in the course include constructions, transformations, similarity, and congruence—and students use the Pythagorean theorem in analytic geometry contexts.

 

Integrated Math II                                                                        1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

Integrated Mathematics II, a second-year high school math course, focuses on extending the number system to include irrational and complex numbers as well as computation with quadratic polynomials. The course continues with quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, including making comparisons to their linear and exponential counterparts, covered in Integrated Mathematics I. The course also introduces conditional probability as a way to make better decisions when given limited information. Geometry topics covered in the course include similarity, right triangle trigonometry, and volume. Students use the tools of analytic geometry, synthesizing algebra, and geometry concepts to describe circles and parabolas in the coordinate plane.

 

Integrated Math III                                                                     1 credit
grades 9-12                                                                                                 N/A pds/wk

In this third-year high school math course, students encounter unified instruction reviewing and expanding all previous high school math topics. First, they extend their work on polynomials beyond quadratics to graphing, problem solving, and working with rational expressions. Next, they use statistical and probability tools, such as the standard normal distribution, to understand data. Students make inferences using simulations, experiments, and surveys. In geometry, they extend trigonometric concepts to general triangles and use trigonometric functions to model periodic processes. Finally, students substantially use mathematical modeling by making use of well developed skills with various mathematical tools.

 

AP Calculus AB                                                                              1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level calculus course. Calculus helps scientists, engineers, and financial analysts understand the complex relationships behind real-world phenomena. Students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and apply mathematical reasoning to real-world models. Students also learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Students prepare for the AP exam.

 

AP Statistics                                                                                1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Statistics—the art of drawing conclusions from imperfect data and the science of real-world uncertainties—plays an important role in many fields. Students collect, analyze, graph, and interpret real-world data. They learn to design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating examples from real research. Students prepare for the AP exam.

 

Science

Physical Science                                                                           1 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

Students explore the relationship between matter and energy by investigating force and motion, the structure of atoms, the structure and properties of matter, chemical reactions, and the interactions of energy and matter. Students develop skills in measuring, solving problems, using laboratory apparatuses, following safety procedures, and adhering to experimental procedures. Students focus on inquiry-based learning with laboratory investigations and experiences.

 

Earth Science                                                                                1 credit
grades 10-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

This course provides students with a solid earth science curriculum, focusing on geology, oceanography, astronomy, weather, and climate. The program consists of online lessons, an associated reference book, collaborative activities, and laboratories students can conduct at home. The course provides a base for further studies in geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy, and gives practical experience in implementing scientific methods.

 

Honors Earth Science                                                                    1 credit
Grade 10-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

This challenging course provides students with an honors-level earth science curriculum, focusing on geology, oceanography, astronomy, weather, and climate. The program consists of online lessons, an associated reference book, collaborative activities, and laboratories students can conduct at home. The course prepares students for advanced studies in geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy courses, and gives them more sophisticated experience in implementing scientific methods. Additional honors assignments include debates, research papers, and extended collaborative laboratories.

 

Environmental Science                                                            .05 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

This course surveys key topic areas, including the application of scientific process to environmental analysis; ecology; energy flow; ecological structures; earth systems; and atmospheric, land, and water science. Topics also include the management of natural resources and analysis of private and governmental decisions involving the environment. Students explore actual case studies and conduct five hands-on, unit-long research activities, learning that political and private decisions about the environment and the use of resources require accurate application of scientific processes, including proper data collection and responsible conclusions.

 

Biology                                                                                            1 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk
Prerequisite: Geo-Environmental Science

In this course, students focus on the chemistry of living things: the cell, genetics, evolution, the structure and function of living things, and ecology. The program consists of online lessons, including extensive animations, an associated reference book, collaborative activities, and laboratory experiments students can conduct at home.

Honors Biology                                                                              1 credit
Grade 10-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

This course provides students with a challenging honors-level biology curriculum, focusing on the chemistry of living things: the cell, genetics, evolution, the structure and function of living things, and ecology. The program consists of advanced online lessons, including extensive animations, an associated reference book, collaborative explorations, and laboratory experiments students can conduct at home. Honors activities include debates, research papers, and extended laboratories.

 

Chemistry                                                                                       1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk
Prerequisite: Biology I, Algebra I, and Geometry

This course surveys all key areas of chemistry, including atomic structure, chemical bonding and reactions, solutions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The course includes direct online instruction, laboratories, and related assessments, used with a problem-solving book.

 

Honors Chemistry                                                                         1 credit
Grade 11-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk
Prerequisite: Biology I, Geometry, Algebra II 

This advanced course gives students a solid basis to move on to more advanced courses. The challenging course surveys all key areas, including atomic structure, chemical bonding and reactions, solutions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry, enhanced with challenging model problems and assessments. Students complete community-based written research projects, treat aspects of chemistry that require individual research and reporting, and participate in online threaded discussions.

 

Physics                                                                                            1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk
Prerequisite: Geometry, Algebra II 

This course provides a comprehensive survey of all key areas: physical systems, measurement, kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, and magnetism, and introduces students to modern physics topics such as quantum theory and the atomic nucleus. The course gives students a solid basis to move on to more advanced courses later in their academic careers. The program consists of online instruction, laboratories, and related assessments, plus an associated problem-solving book.

 

Honors Physics                                                                              1 credit
Grade 11-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk
Concurrent or prerequisite: Applied Pre-Calculus or Calculus  

This advanced course surveys all key areas: physical systems, measurement, kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, and magnetism, and introduces students to modern physics topics such as quantum theory and the atomic nucleus. Additional honors assignments include debates, research papers, and extended laboratories. The course gives a solid basis for moving on to more advanced college physics courses. The program consists of online instruction, laboratories, and related assessments, plus an associated problem-solving book.

 

AP Biology                                                                                                       1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk
Prerequisite: Biology I, Chemistry, Algebra II

This course guides students to a deeper understanding of biological concepts, including the diversity and unity of life, energy and the processes of life, homeostasis, and genetics. Students learn about regulation, communication, and signaling in living organisms, and interactions of biological systems. Students carry out a number of learning activities, including readings, interactive exercises, extension activities, hands-on and virtual laboratory experiments, and practice assessments. These activities are designed to help students gain an understanding of the science process and critical-thinking skills necessary to answer questions on the AP Biology exam.

 

AP Environmental Science                                                           1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk
Prerequisite: Biology I, Physical Science (Chemistry or Physics), Algebra

I
Concurrent: Geo-Environmental AP Environmental Science is equivalent to an introductory college-level environmental science course and is designed to prepare students for the College Board AP Environmental Science Exam. AP Environmental Science is interdisciplinary, incorporating various topics from different disciplines and areas of science.

 

AP Chemistry                                                                                 1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk
Prerequisites: Chemistry, Algebra II

Students solve chemical problems by using mathematical formulation principles and chemical calculations in addition to laboratory experiments. They build on their general understanding of chemical principles and engage in a more in-depth study of the nature and reactivity of matter. Students focus on the structure of atoms, molecules, and ions, and then go on to analyze the relationship between molecular structure and chemical and physical properties. To investigate this relationship, students examine the molecular composition of common substances and learn to transform them through chemical reactions with increasingly predictable outcomes. Students prepare for the AP exam.

 

Astronomy                                                                                    0.5 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

This course introduces students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development, basic scientific laws of motion and gravity, the concepts of modern astronomy, and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and the sun and stars. Using online tools, students examine the life cycle of stars, the properties of planets, and the exploration of space.

 

Anatomy and Physiology I                                                           1 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                                             N/A pds/wk

Anatomy and Physiology Level 1 provide an introduction to the basics required for the study of the human body and how it functions. Students will receive a general introduction to life functions, the terminology, and phonetic pronunciations used to describe body parts and their locations as well as an overall review of human development and body processes. This course also includes Infection Control and Standard Precautions, which emphasizes the importance of maintaining health and safety in the health care work environment as well as highlights the latest practices and protocols. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.

 

Anatomy and Physiology II                                                         1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                             N/A pds/wk

Anatomy and Physiology Level 2 provide an introduction to the basics required for the study of the human body and how it functions. Students will receive a general introduction to life functions, the terminology, and phonetic pronunciations used to describe body parts and their locations as well as an overall review of human development and body processes. This course also includes Infection Control and Standard Precautions, which emphasizes the importance of maintaining health and safety in the health care work environment as well as highlights the latest practices and protocols. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.

 

Great Minds in Science                                                                0.5 credit
Grades     10-12                                                                                          N/A pds/wk

                                                                                                                 

This course focuses on ten of today's greatest scientific minds. Each unit takes an in-depth look at one of these individuals, and shows how their ideas may help to shape tomorrow's world.


Criminology                                                                                  0.5 credit
Grades     10-12                                                                                          N/A pds/wk

This course introduces students to the field of criminology, the study of crime. Students look at possible explanations for crime from psychological, biological, and sociological perspectives; explore the categories and social consequences of crime; and investigate how the criminal justice system handles criminals and their misdeeds. The course explores some key questions: Why do some individuals commit crimes while others do not? What aspects of culture and society promote crime? Why are different punishments given for the same crime? What factors—from arrest to punishment—help shape the criminal case process?

Social Studies

American History                                                                        
1 credit
Grade 9                                                                                                        N/A pds/wk

This course is a full-year survey that provides students with a view of American history from the first migrations of nomadic people to North America to recent events. Readings are drawn from The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Online lessons help students organize their study, explore topics, review in preparation for assessments, and practice skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating timelines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research.

 

Honors Modern U.S. History                                                        1 credit
Grade 9                                                                                                      N/A pds/wk

This course is a challenging full-year survey that provides students with a comprehensive view of American history from the industrial revolution of the late nineteenth century to recent events. Readings are drawn from The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Lessons help students organize study, explore topics in-depth, review in preparation for assessments, and practice advanced skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating time lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research. Students complete independent projects each semester.

 

World History                                                                              1 credit
Grade 10                                                                                                      N/A pds/wk

In this survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times, students focus on the key developments and events that have shaped civilization across time. The course is organized chronologically and, within broad eras, regionally. Lessons address developments in religion, philosophy, the arts, science and technology, and political history. The course also introduces geography concepts and skills within the context of the historical narrative. Lessons and assessments complement World History: Our Human Story. Students analyze primary sources and maps, create time lines, and complete other projects—practicing historical thinking and writing skills as they explore the broad themes and big ideas of human history.

 

Honors World History                                                                   1 credit
Grade 10                                                                                                    N/A pds/wk

In this challenging survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times, students focus in-depth on the developments and events that have shaped civilization across time. The course is organized chronologically and, within broad eras, regionally. Lessons address developments in religion, philosophy, the arts, science and technology, and political history. The course also introduces geography concepts and skills within the context of the historical narrative. Lessons and assessments complement World History: Our Human Story. Students are challenged to consider topics in-depth as they analyze primary sources and maps, create time lines, and complete other projects—practicing advanced historical thinking and writing skills as they explore the broad themes and big ideas of human history. Students complete an independent honors project each semester.

 

American Government                                                               0.5 credit
Grade 11                                                                                                    N/A pds/wk

This course uses the perspective of political institutions to explore government history, organization, and functions. Students encounter the political culture of our country from the Declaration of Independence to the present day, gaining insight into the challenges faced by presidents, members of Congress, and other political participants. The course also covers the roles of political parties, interest groups, the media, and the Supreme Court. Students learn to use primary historical documents as evidence in evaluating past events and government functions.

 

Civics                                                                                           0.5 credit
Grade 11                                                                                                    N/A pds/wk

Civics is the study of citizenship and government. This one-semester course provides students with a basic understanding of civic life, politics, and government, and a short history of government’s foundation and development in this country. Students learn how power and responsibility are shared and limited by government, the impact American politics has on world affairs, the place of law in the American constitutional system, and which rights the American government guarantees its citizens. Students also examine how the world is organized politically and how civic participation in the American political system compares to that in other societies around the world today.

 American Government and Civics must be paired during a student’s junior year.

 Sociology                                                                                    1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

The world is becoming more complex. How do your beliefs, values, and behavior affect the people around you and the world in which you live? Students examine social problems in the increasingly connected world, and learn how human relationships can strongly influence and impact their lives. Exciting online video journeys to an array of areas in the sociological world are an important component of this relevant and engaging course.

 

Psychology                                                                                 0.5 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

In this one-semester course, students investigate why human beings think and act the way they do. This is an introductory course that broadly covers several areas of psychology. Instructional material presents theories and current research for students to critically evaluate and understand. Each unit introduces terminology, theories, and research that are critical to the understanding of psychology and includes tutorials and interactive exercises. Students learn how to define and use key terms of psychology and how to apply psychological principles to their own lives. Units include Methods of Study, Biological Basis for Behavior, Learning and Memory, Development and Individual Differences, and Psychological Disorders.

 

World Religions                                                                         0.5 credit
Grades     10-12                                                                                          N/A pds/wk

Throughout the ages, religions from around the world have shaped the political, social, and cultural aspects of societies. This course focuses on the major religions that have played a role in human history, including Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, and Taoism. Students trace the major developments in these religions and explore their relationships with social institutions and culture. The course also looks at some of the similarities and differences among the major religions and examines the connections and influences they have.

 

International Business                                                              0.5 credit
Grades 10-                                                                             N/A pds/wk

From geography to culture, global business is an exciting topic in the business community today. This course helps students develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in the global marketplace. It takes a global view of business, investigating why and how companies go international, and how they are more interconnected. Students gain an understanding of how economic, social, cultural, political, and legal factors influence both domestic and cross-border business. Business structures, global entrepreneurship, business management, marketing, and the challenges of managing international organizations are also explored. The course helps students cultivate a mindfulness of how history, geography, language, cultural studies, research skills, and continuing education are important in 21st-century business activities.


Economics                                                                                 0.5 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

Students are introduced to the basics of economic principles, and they will learn the importance of understanding different economic systems. They will also investigate how to think like an economist. Students will explore different economic systems, including the American free enterprise system, and they will analyze and interpret data to understand the laws of supply and demand. Students will also be presented with economic applications in today’s world. From economics in the world of business, money, banking, and finance, students will see how economics is applied both domestically and globally. Students will also study how the government is involved in establishing economic stability in the American free enterprise system as well as the how the U.S. economy has a global impact.

 

Social Problems                                                                            1 credit
Grades     9-12                                                                                             N/A pds/wk

Students learn about the complex relationship among societies, governments, and the individual. Each unit focuses on a particular area of concern, often within a global context. Possible solutions at both the structural level as well as that of the individual are examined. Students learn more about how social problems affect them personally.


Contemporary World Issues                                                                1 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                        N/A pds/wk

Students analyze governments, economies, peoples, and cultures from around the world in this course. Instruction emphasizes the structures and policies of the United States and how they compare to other systems in the international community. Students apply critical thinking and research skills to examine current events and contemporary issues.

 
Anthropology                                                                      0.5 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                                         N/A pds/wk

Anthropologists research the characteristics and origins of the cultural, social, and physical development of humans and consider why some cultures change and others come to an end. In this course, students are introduced to the five main branches of anthropology: physical, cultural, linguistic, social, and archeological. Through instruction and their own investigation and analysis, students explore these topics while considering their relationship to other social sciences such as history, geography, sociology, economics, political science, and psychology. Emulating professional anthropologists, students apply their knowledge and observational skills to the real-life study of cultures in the United States and around the world.

Archaeology                                                                         0.5 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

George Santayana once said, those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. The field of archaeology helps us better understand the events and societies of the past that have helped shape our modern world. This course focuses on the techniques, methods, and theories that guide the study of the past. Students learn how archaeological research is conducted and interpreted as well as how artifacts are located and preserved. Finally, students learn about the relationship of material items to culture and what we can learn about past societies from these items.

 

Law and Order/Legal Studies                                                                       0.5 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

This course focuses on the creation and application of laws in society. Topics include how law and ethics are intertwined, the lawmaking process, and the steps involved in the court system. In addition, students will take a closer look at individual types of laws, including criminal, tort, consumer, and family law.

  

AP Macroeconomics                                                                  0.5 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify trends in our economy, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. Students also examine how individuals and institutions are influenced by employment rates, government spending, inflation, taxes, and production. Students prepare for the AP exam.

 
AP Microeconomics                                                                    0.5 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students explore the behavior of individuals and businesses as they exchange goods and services in the marketplace. Students learn why the same product can cost different amounts at different stores, in different cities, and at different times. Students also learn to spot patterns in economic behavior and learn how to use those patterns to explain buyer and seller behavior under various conditions. Lessons promote an understanding of the nature and function of markets, the role of scarcity and competition, the influence of factors such as interest rates on business decisions, and the role of government in the economy. Students prepare for the AP exam.

 

AP Psychology                                                                                                 0.5 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students receive an overview of current psychological research methods and theories. They explore the therapies used by professional counselors and clinical psychologists, and examine the reasons for normal human reactions: how people learn and think, the process of human development and human aggression, altruism, intimacy, and self-reflection. They study core psychological concepts, such as the brain and sensory functions, and learn to gauge human reactions, gather information, and form meaningful syntheses. Students prepare for the AP exam.

AP US History                                                                                1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

Students explore and analyze the economic, political, and social transformation of the United States since the time of the first European encounters. Students are asked to master not only the wide array of factual information necessary to do well on the AP exam, but also to practice skills of critical analysis of historical information and documents. Students read primary and secondary source materials and analyze problems presented by historians to gain insight into challenges of interpretation and the ways in which historical events have shaped American society and culture. (Available on Online School Platform only.)

 

AP US Government                                                                     0.5 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

In this course, students explore the operations and structure of the U.S. government. Students evaluate political data, hypotheses, concepts, opinions, and processes and learn how to gather data about political behavior and develop their own theoretical analysis of American politics. Students also build the skills they need to examine general propositions about government and politics, and to analyze specific relationships between political, social, and economic institutions. Students prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in political science, law, education, business, and history.

 

AP World History                                                                                             1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

This course spans the Neolithic Age to the present in a rigorous academic format organized by chronological periods and viewed through fundamental concepts and course themes. Students analyze the causes and processes of continuity and change across historical periods. Themes include human–environment interaction, cultures, expansion and conflict, political and social structures, and economic systems. In addition to mastering historical content, students cultivate historical thinking skills that involve crafting arguments based on evidence, identifying causation, comparing and supplying context for events and phenomenon, and developing historical interpretation. This course prepares students for the AP World History exam.

 

World Languages

French I                                                                                                               1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

Students begin their introduction to French by focusing on the four key areas of world language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases; comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns; participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored.

 

French II                                                                                                                1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

Students continue their study of French by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; understand common vocabulary terms and phrases; use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing; participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By the second semester, the course is conducted almost entirely in French.

 

French III                                                                                                            1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

Students further deepen their understanding of French by focusing on the three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Each unit consists of a variety of activities which teach the students how to understand more difficult written and spoken passages, to communicate with others through informal speaking and writing interactions, and to express their thoughts and opinions in both formal and Informal spoken and written contexts. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; use correct vocabulary terms and phrases naturally; incorporate a wide range of grammar concepts consistently and correctly while speaking and writing; participate in conversations covering a wide range of topics; respond appropriately to conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries; read and analyze important pieces of literature; and take frequent assessments by which their language progression can be monitored. The course is conducted almost entirely in French.

 

AP French Language                                                                    1 credit
Grade 12                                                                                                    N/A pds/wk

The AP French Language and Culture course is an advanced language course that prepares students for the AP French Language and Culture exam. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. The course is conducted almost exclusively in French, and is based on the six themes required by the College Board: global challenges, science and technology, contemporary life, personal and public identities, families and communities, and beauty and aesthetics. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students should expect to listen to, read, and understand a wide variety of authentic French-language materials and sources; demonstrate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication using French; gain knowledge and understanding of the cultures of the francophone world; use French to connect with other disciplines and expand knowledge in a wide variety of contexts; develop insight into the nature of the French language and its culture; and use French to participate in communities at home and around the world. The AP French Language and Culture course is a college-level course.

 

German I                                                                                                                1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

Students begin their introduction to German by focusing on the four key areas of world language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases; comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns; participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored.

 

German II                                                                                                           1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

Students continue their study of German by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also start to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; understand common vocabulary terms and phrases; use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing; participate in conversations; respond appropriately to conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German speaking countries; and take frequent assessments by which their language progression can be monitored.

 

Latin I                                                                                           1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk        
Since mastering a classical language presents different challenges from learning a spoken world language, students learn Latin through ancient, time-honored classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, provide students with a strong foundation for learning Latin. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. Students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases; comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns; understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored.

 

Latin II                                                                                          1 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                          N/A pds/wk

Prerequisite: Latin I                                                                                                

Students continue with their study of Latin through ancient, time-honored classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, prepare students for a deeper study of Latin. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept; reading comprehension activities; writing activities; multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations; and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. Students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; understand and use common vocabulary terms and phrases; comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns; understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored.

 

Chinese                                                                                         1 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

Students begin their introduction to Chinese by focusing on the four key areas of world language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored.

 

Chinese II                                                                                      1 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk
Prerequisite: Chinese I

Students continue their study of Chinese by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also start to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus of the course and students are expected to learn several characters each unit. However, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in listening and reading comprehension. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; understand common vocabulary terms and phrases; use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing; participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking regions; and take frequent assessments by which their language progression can be monitored.

 

Spanish I                                                                                     1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

Students begin their introduction to Spanish by focusing on the four key areas of world language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases; comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns; participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored.

 

Spanish II                                                                                      1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

Students continue their study of Spanish by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also start to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; understand common vocabulary terms and phrases; use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing; participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish speaking countries; and take frequent assessments by which their language progression can be monitored. By Semester 2, the course is conducted almost entirely in Spanish.

 

Spanish III                                                                                 1 credit
Gr
ades 9-12                                                                                             N/A pds/wk

Students further deepen their understanding of Spanish by focusing on the three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Each unit consists of a variety of activities which teach the students how to understand more difficult written and spoken passages, to communicate with others through informal speaking and writing interactions, and to express their thoughts and opinions in more formal spoken and written contexts. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; use correct vocabulary terms and phrases naturally; incorporate a wide range of grammar concepts consistently and correctly while speaking and writing; participate in conversations covering a wide range of topics and respond appropriately to conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries; read and analyze important pieces of Hispanic literature; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored.

 

AP Spanish Language                                                                  1 credit
Grade 12                                                                                                  N/A pds/wk

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is an advanced language course in which students acquire proficiencies that expand their cognitive, analytical and communicative skills. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course prepares students for the AP Spanish Language and Culture exam. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational) as defined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the twenty-first century. The course is designed as an immersion experience and is conducted almost exclusively in Spanish. In addition, all student work, practices, projects, participation, and assessments are in Spanish. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. In addition, students participate in a forum where they are able to share their own opinions and comments about various topics and comment on other students’ posts. The course also makes great use of the Internet for updated and current material.

 

Career & Technology

Accounting                                                                                   1 credit
Grades 10-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

General Accounting provide students with a foundation in the mechanics of accounting as well as the opportunity to apply accounting concepts to real-world situations and make informed business decisions. Students will explore real world case studies of companies such as TOMs Shoes, iTunes, American Eagle, McDonald's, and Google. Students will master valued skills, such as critical thinking and technology use, and commercial technology. Students will be equipped to work with Microsoft Excel, Peachtree, QuickBooks, and Automated Accounting Online. The courses include units on careers in accounting, ethics, global awareness, financial literacy, and forensic accounting.

 

Business and Healthcare Explorations                                    0.5 credit
Grade 9-12                                                                                                 N/A pds/wk

This course is designed as an exploration of two career clusters. Students will get an introduction to these fields so that they can better assess which pathway to pursue. In this course, students explore basic concepts in the broad areas of business and health care as well as career options in each area. In addition to studying concepts of entrepreneurship, accounting, and marketing, students explore these concepts on scales that range from a single person to nations. The second part of this course introduces students to the various disciplines within the health sciences, including toxicology, clinical medicine, and biotechnology. Students explore the importance of diagnostics and research in the identification and treatment of diseases.

 

Computer Fundamentals (MSFT Office)                                     1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

In this introductory course, students will become familiar with the basic principles of a personal computer, including the internal hardware, the operating system, and software applications. Students will gain practice in using key applications, such as word processors, spreadsheets, and presentation software, as well as understand social and ethical issues around the Internet, information, and security. This is a two-semester course package. In the first semester, the focus is on the fundamentals, learning and using the applications, and understanding the basic roles and responsibilities of the software, hardware, and operating system. In the second semester, the focus is on gathering and analyzing data, and using the right tools and methods to collect and present data. This course should not be taken if the student has already completed Computer Literacy.

 

Digital Arts                                                                                   1 credit
Grade 9-12                                                                                                 N/A pds/wk

In this exploratory course, students learn the elements and principles of design as well as foundational concepts of visual communication. While surveying a variety of media and art, students use image editing, animation, and digital drawing to put into practice the art principles they’ve learned. They explore career opportunities in the design, production, display, and presentation of digital artwork. They respond to the artwork of others, and learn how to combine artistic elements to create finished pieces that effectively communicate their ideas. By the end of the course, they have created a collection of digital art projects for their digital design portfolio

Game Design                                                                                 1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

Game Design encourages students to use their creative and technical skills as they learn about the many aspects of designing games. The course explores different types of video game software and hardware, various gaming platforms, the technical skills necessary to design games, troubleshooting, internet safety techniques, and the history of gaming. Students also have the opportunity to create their own plan for a 2D video game. They explore various video game software and hardware, sharpen their coding skills, and learn about game storylines, player progression, and algorithmic decision making. Students learn to analyze player goals, player actions, rewards, and challenges, among many other gameplay components. The course helps students develop 21st-century skills involving creativity, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and technical expertise that will put them at the forefront of a future in technology.

 

IT and Manufacturing Explorations                                         .05 credit
Grade 10-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

This course is designed as an exploration of two career clusters. Students get an introduction to these fields so that they can better assess which pathway to pursue. The first half of the course provides a comprehensive introduction to the essentials of web design, from planning page layouts to publishing a complete site to the web. Students learn how to use HTML to design their own web pages. The course covers basic HTML tags for formatting text as well as more advanced tags. Through real-world design scenarios and hands-on projects, students create compelling, usable websites using the latest suite of free tools. The second half of the course has an introduction to engineering and to advanced manufacturing.

 

Introduction to Computer Science                                           .05 credit
Grade 9-12                                                                                                 N/A pds/wk

This course provides a solid foundation using an algorithm-driven approach that is ideal for students’ first course in Computer Science. Students will learn about emerging topics, such as privacy, drones, cloud computing, and net. Students will also be introduced to programming languages such as C++, Java, Python, C#, and Ada.

 

Introduction to Medical Terminology                                      .05 credit
Grade 11-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

This course is designed for the beginning health care student and simplifies the process of learning hundreds of complex medical terms. The course helps students understand specialties, pathology, diagnostic, and treatment procedures. The course includes critical thinking exercise scenarios that involve patients and pathology so students can apply their knowledge to the real world.

 

Java Programming                                                                       1 credit
Grades 11-12
                                                                                          N/A pds/wk

Java Programming introduce programmers to the power of Java for developing applications while learning the basic principles of structured and object-oriented programming. These courses incorporate Java with meaningful real-world exercises and a wealth of case problems help students build skills critical for ongoing programming success.

 

Microsoft Word with Certification Preparation                      .05 credit
Grade 9-12                                                                                                 N/A pds/wk

Using a project based approach, students are introduced to Microsoft Word. This course walks students through basic to advanced features by experimenting with document creation. Forms of documents created include research papers, business letters, resumes, letters and mailing labels. Students work through these hands on projects to hone skills in formatting, page layout, macro creation, and a vast variety of commonly used word processing tools. Microsoft Office is required for this course. There are two course version options - Microsoft Office 2013 OR Microsoft Office 2016/365. Office 2016/365 courses will be available by August 2016. If a client already has Microsoft Office 2013 they can use the 2013 course versions that require the Microsoft Office 2013 software. Otherwise, they should use 2016/365. Students can get an educational version for free at this link as long as they use a valid school email address: https://products.office.com/en-us/student/office-in-education

 

Microsoft Power Point with Certification Preparation          .05 credit
Grade 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

Using a project based approach, students are introduced to Microsoft PowerPoint. This course walks student through basic to advanced features by experimenting with presentation creation. Types of activities include, creating presentations that include, text, images, sound, animation, and transition. Students work through these hands on projects to master skills commonly used in presentation software. Microsoft Office is required for this course. There are two course version options - Microsoft Office 2013 OR Microsoft Office 2016/365. Office 2016/365 courses will be available by August 2016. If a client already has Microsoft Office 2013 they can use the 2013 course versions that require the Microsoft Office 2013 software. Otherwise, they should use 2016/365. Students can get an educational version for free at this link as long as they use a valid school email address: https://products.office.com/en-us/student/office-in-education

 

Microsoft Excel with Certification Preparation                     .05 credit
Grade 9-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

Using a project based approach, students are introduced to Microsoft Excel. This course walks students through basic to advanced features by experimenting with spreadsheet creation. Types of activities include, creating worksheets, charts, formulas, functions, what-if analysis, and financial functions. Students work through these hands on projects to master skills in commonly used features of spreadsheets. Microsoft Office is required for this course. There are two course version options - Microsoft Office 2013 OR Microsoft Office 2016/365. Office 2016/365 courses will be available by August 2016. If a client already has Microsoft Office 2013 they can use the 2013 course versions that require the Microsoft Office 2013 software. Otherwise, they should use 2016/365. Students can get an educational version for free at this link as long as they use a valid school email address: https://products.office.com/en-us/student/office-in-education

 

Microsoft Access with Certification Preparation                    .05 credit
Grade 9-12                                                                                                 N/A pds/wk

Using a project based approach, students are introduced to Microsoft Access. This course walks students through basic to advanced features by experimenting with database creation. Types of activities include, creating databases, creating a query, creating a form, creating tables, creating reports, and creating macros. Students work through these hands on projects to master skills in commonly used database design processes. Microsoft Office is required for this course. There are two course version options - Microsoft Office 2013 OR Microsoft Office 2016/365. Office 2016/365 courses will be available by August 2016. If a client already has Microsoft Office 2013 they can use the 2013 course versions that require the Microsoft Office 2013 software. Otherwise, they should use 2016/365. Students can get an educational version for free at this link as long as they use a valid school email address: https://products.office.com/en-us/student/office-in-education

 

Web Design                                                                                 0.5 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                             N/A pds/wk

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the essentials of web design, from planning page layouts to publishing a complete site to the web. Students learn how to use HTML to design their own web pages. The course covers basic HTML tags for formatting text as well as more advanced tags. Through real-world design scenarios and hands-on projects, students create compelling, usable websites using the latest suite of free tools.

 

Personal Finance                                                                       0.5 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

In this introductory finance course, students learn basic principles of economics and best practices for managing their own finances. Students learn core skills in creating budgets, developing long-term financial plans to meet their goals, and making responsible choices about income and expenses. They gain a deeper understanding of capitalism and other systems so they can better understand their role in the economy of society.

 

Achieving Your Career and College Goals                               0.5 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

Students explore their options for life after high school and implement plans to achieve their goals. They identify their aptitudes, skills, and preferences, and explore a wide range of potential careers. They investigate the training and education required for the career of their choice, and create a plan to be sure that their work in high school is preparing them for the next step. They also receive practical experience in essential skills such as searching and applying for college, securing financial aid, writing a resume and cover letter, and interviewing for a job. This course is geared toward 11th and 12th graders

 

Career Explorations                                                                  0.5 credit
Grades 9-10                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

This one-semester course provides an overview of careers available today and helps students identify careers that may suit them. Course content covers the importance of work to individuals and society; the difference between a job and a career; identifying personal strengths, weaknesses, and interests and how they apply to possible careers; the importance of proper work etiquette; and an exploration of various careers in several career clusters. Students complete self-evaluations to determine which careers may be of interest to them. Assignments, including research and interviews, supplement the instructional content and provide a hands-on approach to creating a career plan for the future.

 

Life Skills                                                                                     0.5 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

This one-semester elective is designed to increase students’ knowledge of and ability in using the skills necessary for everyday living. Life Skills emphasizes defining personal values, goal-setting and planning, and solving problems. Instructional material focuses on dealing with media and peer pressure, communication and relationships, working with others, avoiding and/or resolving conflict, decision making, wellness and personal safety, aspects of good citizenship, environmental awareness, and how students can contribute to their own community. The course is organized in six units: Course Introduction; Thinking About Yourself; Thinking for Yourself; Taking Care of Yourself; Caring for Your Relationships; and Caring About Your World.

 

Family and Consumer Science                                                                         0.5 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

In this course, students develop skills and knowledge to help them transition into adult roles within the family. They learn to make wise consumer choices, prepare nutritious meals, contribute effectively as part of a team, manage a household budget, and balance roles of work and family. They gain an appreciation for the responsibilities of family members throughout the life span and the contributions to the well-being of the family and the community.

Additional Offerings

AP Art History                                                                                                      1 credit
Grades 11-12                                                                                              N/A pds/wk

AP Art History is an introduction to major works of art and the concepts needed to understand them. This online course fosters in-depth, holistic understanding of the history of art from a global perspective, and builds understanding of the place of art within broader historical, cultural, religious, and political frameworks. The functions and effects of art are the main focus. This AP Art History course is designed to be equivalent with a two-semester introductory college-level art history survey course.

 

Art in World Cultures                                                                 0.5 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

Students will learn about some of the greatest artists while also creating art of their own, including digital art. The course explores the basic principles and elements of art, how to critique art, and how to examine some of the traditional art of the Americas, Africa, and Oceania in addition to the development of Western art.

 

Driver’s Education                                                                    0.2 Credit
Grades 10-12                                                                                             N/A pds/wk

This course is designed to create an awareness of the needs and problems involoved in operating a motor vehicle safely and efficiently.  The focus of this course includes: developing knowledge, skill, and positive attitudes in relation to laws, decision making, visual habits, and safe driving practices.

 

Health I                                                                                       0.6 credit
Grade 9                                                                                                     N/A pds/wk

This course focuses on important skills and knowledge in nutrition; physical activity; the dangers of substance use and abuse; injury prevention and safety; growth and development; and personal health, environmental conservation, and community health resources. The curriculum is designed around topics and situations that engage student discussion and motivate students to analyze internal and external influences on their health-related decisions. The course helps students build the skills they need to protect, enhance, and promote their own health and the health of others.

 

Health II                                                                                     0.5 credit
Grade 11 or 12                                                                                           N/A pds/wk

This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of health issues that will impact their lives as adults.  The focus of this course includes: growth and development, disease prevention, first aid, nutrition and weight management, and violence prevention. 

  

Physical Education                                                                   0.25 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                               N/A pds/wk

Physical education provides students with an opportunity to learn physically, socially, and emotionally through physical activity.  The objectives of the Physical Education program are to develop physical fitness, knowledge, and theory of individual and team sports; and to learn new skills and concepts that lead to healthy, productive lives as adults.  Courses focus on the fundamental components, principles of fitness, safety guidelines, proper techniques, and exercise principles such as the FITT. Students will also learn strategies to help them begin, design, and maintain an exercise program to keep them fit for life.

 

Nutrition & Wellness                                                                 0.5 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                             N/A pds/wk

This one-semester elective course provides students with an overview of good nutrition principles that are necessary for physical and mental wellness and a long, healthy life. Instructional materials include discussions of digestion, basic nutrients, weight management, sports and fitness, and life-span nutrition. The course emphasizes an understanding of today’s food and eating trends and gives students the capacity to intelligently evaluate all available sources of nutrition information and make informed decisions. The course is organized in six units: Course Introduction; Wellness and Food Choices in Today’s World; Digestion and Major Nutrients; Body Size and Weight Management; Physical Fitness, Sports Nutrition, and Stress; and Life Cycle Nutrition.

 

Music Appreciation                                                                   1 credit
Grades 9-12                                                                                                N/A pds/wk

This course introduces students to the history, theory, and genres of music. The first semester covers basic music theory concepts as well as early musical forms, classical music, patriotic and nationalistic music, and 20th century music. The second semester presents modern traditions, including American jazz, gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip hop. The course explores the history of music, from the surviving examples of rudimentary musical forms through to contemporary pieces from around the world. To comply with certain state standards for the arts, a student “performance practicum” is required for full credit each semester. The performance practicum requirement can be met through participation in supervised instrumental or vocal lessons, church or community choirs, community musical performances, or any other structured program that meets at regular intervals and provides opportunities for students to build vocal and/or instrumental skills. Parents or guardians will be required to present their student's proposed practicum to the students’ teachers for approval, and validate their student's regular participation in the chosen performance practicum.

Probability and Statistics

Students learn counting methods, probability, descriptive statistics, graphs of data, the normal curve, statistical inference, and linear regression. Proficiency is measured through frequent online and offline assessments as well as asynchronous discussions. Problem-solving activities provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate their skills in real-world situations.